Super Gimp!

Life as a disabled comic book creator

Slight Delays

As most of you know, #1 was supposed to be out this week. It’ll be on stands on the 24th instead, one week late.

#2 will also be between 1-3 weeks late.

Family drama and the resulting fallout have wiped me out. I’m now supporting 2 extra people on my already shitty income, and that means more nights on the Strip and less time making comics.

To keep the book from being perpetually late, I’m writing and shooting ALL of #2-#5 in one chunk so I can just draw pages without having to worry about the next issue. As I draw 2-3 pages a day, that means I’ll be completing issues in 7-12 days each. Jay Savage colors about as fast. So while #2 will ship late, #3 will be on time, and I’ll probably have #4 and #5 ready to go early.

TL;DR, family shit has clobbered me. Books are still coming out but will be shipping a bit late.

Comics You Should Read: A Voice in the Dark

thelonelyskeptic:

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So I just finished reading the first volume of A Voice in the Dark by Larime Taylor. And it was pretty awesome.

The story can be summed up pretty simply: it’s about Zoey Aarons, a young college student who is also a budding serial killer. But that description sort of eliminates what makes…

Thanks for the kind words! Funny thing is, I got my own campus radio station first week of college - it’s one bit lifted from personal experience - and people always flag it as the least-credible thing. Anyway, glad you liked it!

Style Idea

athenaltena:

larime:

So issue #2 opens with a flashback to Zoey’s childhood. I’m seriously considering drawing it Boondocks style. Thoughts?

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I like the concept in principal (world needs more Boondocks and references to Jasmine) but think it depends on the tone of the scene. If the scene is somewhat comedic and like The Boondocks it could work, but otherwise it might be jarring.

It would be a mix of comedic and serious. I like it because it’s a clear shift in style to mark the change in view rather than just a caption or voice-over. Plus it would be adorable.

Style Idea

So issue #2 opens with a flashback to Zoey’s childhood. I’m seriously considering drawing it Boondocks style. Thoughts?

All About Me and My Comic

Let’s try this again!

My name is Larime Taylor, and I’m a cartoonist. That’s the official, fancy term for someone who writes and illustrates their own comics, as opposed to just writing or penciling or coloring. I do the entire book, from script to finished, lettered pages, at the rate of 2-4 finished pages a day, which I’m told is pretty fast.

I also do it all with my mouth.

I was born with Arthrogryposis, a birth defect that leaves me with my joints in locked positions and little-to-no use of my arms and legs. I’ve been drawing by mouth since I was little, and have a professional background as a caricature artist. I’ve only made the jump to doing my own comics in the last year when my first issue was published by Top Cow/Image in November of 2013.

My book, A VOICE IN THE DARK, started as a Kickstarter to help me do a self-published pilot of sorts and get a publisher, and it worked. I got picked up by Top Cow, a part of Image Comics. Despite nearly universal rave reviews (<—- read them at the link!), however, sales are languishing. That’s largely because I’m a new creator, I’ve never worked at Marvel or DC, and few people know who I am.

It’s also in part because my book was black and white (the next mini will be in color), and features a predominantly female cast of characters, many of color, and with realistic body types instead of hyper-sexualized fap material.

Here’s a bit about the book:

Some people become killers.

Zoey was born that way.

Ever since she can remember, Zoey Aarons has felt the urge to kill. For eighteen years she resisted those urges and fought to be someone better than her base instincts would allow. In a moment of weakness and anger, however, she let go and took a life. That hazy Seattle summer day still haunts her, and as she begins college far away from home, she’s afraid that she will kill again.

She’s right to be afraid.

Instead of leaving that fateful day behind her and starting a new life as a college freshman, Zoey’s about to be tested and face temptation in ways far greater than she could ever imagine. The prestigious women’s college that she’s attending on a full academic scholarship is in Cutter’s Circle, California, and Cutter’s Circle has a dirty little secret: it has the highest population of serial killers in the country. The town is up to its proverbial severed head in murderers.

If you’re familiar with the movie HEATHERS, it’s a major influence. The book is dark, but it’s also funny. Here’s a trailer for the first volume, written in the same tongue-in-cheek sense of humor as the comic.

 Zoey is of mixed-race, her black uncle is an openly gay homicide detective, her best friend from high school is an Asian lesbian, her dormmates range from a bubbly blonde sorority girl to an Hispanic business major to a bisexual goth-punk. I don’t write diverse characters as a checklist, they are bits and pieces of people I know or grew up with. They’re living, breathing characters.

So other than trying to spread the word, why am I posting this? Because as I said earlier, sales are dwindling and the book is nearing a tipping point. If they drop much more I’ll have to abandon it. I believe in this book, and I’m giving you a link to issue #1 (<—- click the link!) for free. It’s a double-sized issue, too. Decide if you like it, and if you do, here’s what you can do:

CALL or GO INTO your local comic shop and order the trade. The order number is APR140534. Don’t get it at Amazon, tell your comic book store there are readers. Monthlies aren’t sold on Amazon, and monthlies are how I make a living.

CALL or GO INTO your local comic shop and order the first two issues of the next volume. The order numbers are JUL140458, and AUG140691. 

If you really want to see more diversity in comics, it starts with supporting the books that are already trying to make a difference. I’m not the only one. RACHEL RISINGGENIUSCONCRETE PARK and many other great books about strong women and people of color are out there and they need your support. We’re all struggling.

Without it, we’ll have to close up shop.

The Book is on Lifesupport

greg-pak:

Just bought the first issue of A VOICE IN THE DARK for 99¢ at Comixology, and it’s great. I’m buying more. Read on for a word from the creator and please consider checking it out.

larime:

I have to admit, I’m frustrated. Sales on the book continue to drop and there doesn’t seem to be much I can do to stop it. I’ve tried everything I can.

I got a big-name voice actor to do my trailer.

I got national news coverage.

I switched the book to color.

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Nothing…

Thank you!

The Book is on Lifesupport

larime:

I have to admit, I’m frustrated. Sales on the book continue to drop and there doesn’t seem to be much I can do to stop it. I’ve tried everything I can.

I got a big-name voice actor to do my trailer.

I got national news coverage.

I switched the book to color.

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Nothing…

First I want to thank everyone who has reblogged or helped spread the word, including Kelly Sue DeConnick, Greg Rucka and Terry Moore. I especially want to thank those of you who went out and ordered or bought copies of the book in any form.

Second, I want to say to those who found my initial post problematic for whatever reason that that was not my intent. Yes, it should have had the name of the book more clearly in it, and that’s my mistake. My book is called A VOICE IN THE DARK, and you can learn about it in my previous posts, my trailer, and by searching for it online via interviews and reviews. I also could have structured it better and made links more easily noticed. Tumblr is not my native platform and I’m not that great at utilizing it just yet. Your feedback is appreciated!

As for the handful of claims (in over 700 notes) that I’m guilting anyone or accusing anyone of not supporting women, people of color, or kittens and puppies if they aren’t buying my book, I respect your opinion, but I disagree. Strongly. I think the post and the intent was pretty clear, and the vast majority of people reading it seem to agree. I wrote it in frustration, yes, and some things can always be worded better, but I’m seeing a few people ascribe to me an attitude that is simply not who I am.

I’m an ally in trying to improve representation in comics because I myself have been ignored, marginalized and treated as an ‘other’ because of my disability. I’m on your side. If you don’t like my book, or how I promote it, or it’s just not your thing, then that’s fine! Really, I don’t mind.

But as someone working in comics and seeing many others outside of DC and Marvel trying to bring diversity to the scene and watching them get ignored and get frustrated, too, I know I’m not making up a problem that doesn’t exist. We’re trying, and we’re losing the fight. We need help.

That’s all I’m really trying to say.

A Small Follow-Up

First I want to thank everyone who has reblogged or helped spread the word, including Kelly Sue DeConnick, Greg Rucka and Terry Moore. I especially want to thank those of you who went out and ordered or bought copies of the book in any form.

Second, I want to say to those who found my initial post problematic for whatever reason that that was not my intent. Yes, it should have had the name of the book more clearly in it, and that’s my mistake. My book is called A VOICE IN THE DARK, and you can learn about it in my previous posts, my trailer, and by searching for it online via interviews and reviews. I also could have structured it better and made links more easily noticed. Tumblr is not my native platform and I’m not that great at utilizing it just yet. Your feedback is appreciated!

As for the handful of claims (in over 700 notes) that I’m guilting anyone or accusing anyone of not supporting women, people of color, or kittens and puppies if they aren’t buying my book, I respect your opinion, but I disagree. Strongly. I think the post and the intent was pretty clear, and the vast majority of people reading it seem to agree. I wrote it in frustration, yes, and some things can always be worded better, but I’m seeing a few people ascribe to me an attitude that is simply not who I am.

I’m an ally in trying to improve representation in comics because I myself have been ignored, marginalized and treated as an ‘other’ because of my disability. I’m on your side. If you don’t like my book, or how I promote it, or it’s just not your thing, then that’s fine! Really, I don’t mind.

But as someone working in comics and seeing many others outside of DC and Marvel trying to bring diversity to the scene and watching them get ignored and get frustrated, too, I know I’m not making up a problem that doesn’t exist. We’re trying, and we’re losing the fight. We need help.

That’s all I’m really trying to say.

ranakanth asked: Hey. An an author I follow boosted your post and got me interested in your comic. I prefer to read stuff digitally, but I saw what you said about monthlies being how you make your income. I was wondering if a subscription through comixology helps out in the same way as buying your book from a brick-and-mortar store? Thanks!

Hi! As far as money, yes, it helps. I suggest hard copies because publishers determine viability based on print orders, not digital, but if digital is easiest for you, go for it.

The Book is on Lifesupport

bluesoliloquy:

larime:

bluesoliloquy:

larime:

bluesoliloquy:

larime:

I have to admit, I’m frustrated. Sales on the book continue to drop and there doesn’t seem to be much I can do to stop it. I’ve tried everything I can.

I got a big-name voice actor to do my trailer.

I got national news coverage.

I switched the book to color.

It sucks for this writer/artist that his book is struggling. I haven’t read it and I hadn’t heard of it until just now. I’m thinking of going to check it out because I do want books about WoC to succeed and I do want solid books that aren’t about superheroes.

But at the same time, I was hesitant to reblog this because of his shitty attitude here. Your book isn’t doing well and “nothing’s working” doesn’t mean people don’t want books about WoC. Of course it sucks to not know why people aren’t picking up your book. Let me start with the fact that this post didn’t mention the title! I had to go digging. (It’s called A Voice in the Dark)

Maybe the subject matter is a rough sell. I looked at the description and I’m not sold. It doesn’t sound like something I want to read, honestly. If I give it a chance at all, it will only be because it’s about a WoC. It might be this amazing book I’m missing out on, but it doesn’t warrant a rant about how comic book readers are shitty and need to step up and support you. The current success of Ms Marvel, for one, shows that readers are supporting books about women of color.

I agree. I even say a few lines later that I DON’T believe those things. Perhaps you missed that part?

No I saw that part. But then you insist that in order to prove that’s not true people have to go buy your book, implying if they don’t they really don’t want books about women to succeed. I’d like to have read something anywhere in this post that was actually in any way about the book itself. There was honestly nothing in the way the post was written to inspire me to go check it out, which is ultimately your goal. It reads like a guilt trip. Pick up this book or you don’t care about diversity in comics.

Except I never say anything of the sort. I don’t say anything remotely close to insisting you must buy my book or you don’t care. I say:

Except I really DON’T believe that. I BELIEVE in what I’m doing. I believe that there’s an audience for it.

It’s time for that audience to step up.

I also say:

If you really want to see more diversity in comics, it starts with supporting the books that are already trying to make a difference. I’m not the only one. RACHEL RISINGGENIUS,CONCRETE PARK and many other great books about strong women and people of color are out there and they need your support.

Without it, we’ll have to close up shop.

To get publishers to make a change, they need to see that change is viable. I name several other books and says specifically it’s NOT just about my book or me.

I think you’re reading a lot into it, and I never say YOU don’t care or aren’t already supporting those kinds of books. If you are, that’s great! Even if you aren’t reading mine.

I’m just telling you how the post comes across to me. And what I think is missing from it that would make me at least, and likely others as well, a lot more inclined to walk away from that post and want to check out your book. Take from that what you will. Or don’t.

And I do appreciate the feedback. Honestly, as the post says up front, I’m frustrated. If that frustration means that some things aren’t worded as well as they could be, that’s fair.